Icknomics: Would more corneas be transplanted if they were called “ocular donations” instead of “eye donations”?

from Market Design at https://bit.ly/32KmOhC on January 31, 2022 at 01:09PM

 Here’s an article in the Journal of Medical Ethics about framing and language associated with the deceased donation of eye tissue.

Arguments for ‘ocular donation’ as standardised terminology to reduce the ‘ick factor’ of ‘eye donation’ by Katrina A Bramstedt  http://orcid.org/0000-0001-5446-0123, 

Abstract: This brief report presents the global problem of the shortfall of donor corneal tissue for transplantation, a potential root cause (‘ick factor’ language), and a potential solution (modification of ‘ick factor’ language). Specifically, use of the term ‘eye donation’ is a potential hurdle to ocular tissue donation as it can stimulate the ‘ick factor.’ Verbiage such as ‘ocular (eye tissue)’ could be a method of providing terminology that is less emotive than ‘eye donor’ or ‘eye donation.’ The field of transplantation has experienced terminology shifts over time; for example, ‘cadaver’ has been replaced with ‘deceased donor,’ ‘harvest’ has been replaced with ‘recover,’ and ‘life support’ has been replaced with ‘ventilated.’ Notably, only a small number of regions worldwide are using ‘ocular’ terminology, yet it could be an important step to enhancing the informed consent process and improving donation rates, potentially increasing transplant and optimising patient quality of life for those with treatable blindness."

"While corneal transplants are the most common transplants worldwide, corneal blindness remains a significant health problem due to the lack of donor corneal tissue. Globally, there is only 1 cornea available for 70 that are needed, leaving nearly 13 million patients awaiting transplant.1 In 45% of countries which provide corneal tissue donation services, the system requires explicit consent from the donor and/or their family (opt-in).1 Several studies worldwide have reported high rates of consent refusal2 3 with concern about the ‘ick factor’ (repulsion/disgust response) of ‘eye donation.’2 4

"the field of transplantation has experienced terminology shifts over time; for example, ‘cadaver’ has been replaced with ‘deceased donor,’ ‘harvest’ has been replaced with ‘recover,’ and ‘life support’ has been replaced with ‘ventilated.’11 ‘Ocular’ (of the eyes or vision) is a concise term that could be used for both eye tissue and whole eyes…"