To Pill or not to Pill? Access to Emergency Contraception and Contraceptive Behaviour

from Health Economics at http://bit.ly/2ss4AM3 on January 14, 2019 at 06:55PM We examine the effects of free-of-charge availability of emergency contraception on contraceptive behaviour in Chile. Using a survey of individuals 15 to 29, we exploit variation in availability at the municipality level as a consequence of legal and judicial decisions in the late 2000s. […]

The Effect of College Education on Health and Mortality: Evidence from Canada

from Health Economics at http://bit.ly/2MbC2zn on January 14, 2019 at 06:55PM We investigate the returns to college attendance in Canada in terms of health and mortality reduction. To do so, we first use a dynamic health microsimulation model to document how interventions which incentivize college attendance among high school graduates may impact their health trajectory, […]

Learning Intensity Effects in Students’ Mental and Physical Health – Evidence from a Large Scale Natural Experiment in Germany

from Health Economics at http://bit.ly/2RceuQO on January 7, 2019 at 05:53PM In this study, we analyze health effects of a recent education reform in Germany exposing students to increased schooling intensity. The reform shortened the higher secondary education track by one year. As the overall curriculum required for graduation was held constant, this led to […]

Consumption, Investment, and Healthcare with Aging

from Health Economics at http://bit.ly/2C1WspS on January 7, 2019 at 05:53PM This paper solves the problem of optimal dynamic consumption, investment, and healthcare spending with isoelastic utility, when natural mortality grows exponentially to reflect Gompertz’ law and investment opportunities are constant. Healthcare slows the natural growth of mortality, indirectly increasing utility from consumption through longer […]

Military Training Exercises, Pollution, and their Consequences for Health

from Health Economics at http://bit.ly/2sfvFCa on January 7, 2019 at 05:53PM Militaries around the world perform training exercises in preparation for war. We study the relationship between in utero exposure to military exercises (bombing) and early-life health outcomes, combining data on naval bombing exercises in Vieques, Puerto Rico, and the universe of births from 1990-2003. […]

Hospital Competition in the National Health Service: Evidence from a Patient Choice Reform

from Health Economics at http://bit.ly/2LW5zgx on January 7, 2019 at 05:53PM We study the impact of exposing hospitals in a National Health Service (NHS) to non-price competition by exploiting a patient choice reform in Norway in 2001. The reform facilitates a difference-in-difference research design due to geographical variation in the scope for competition. Using rich […]